Mayon Watch: Lahar (Part 3 of a series)

It only takes 40 millimeters of sustained, heavy rain for an hour and a half for lahar to occur and if Albay experiences scattered rainshowers due to the tail-end of a cold front just like last weekend, there is a high possibility of lahar.

Renato Solidum, Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) director, said that even if a river channel has old volcanic deposits, rainwater may still plow those deposits, causing lahar.




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​#MayonWatch2018: Everything You Need To Know About Mayon’s Eruption

First, where is Mayon?
Mt. Mayon, the Philippines’ most active volcano, is in the province of Albay. The cities and towns that have jurisdiction over it are Legazpi City, Tabaco City, Ligao City, Guinobatan, Camalig, Daraga, Malilipot, and Sto. Domingo. It is about three hours away from Mt. Bulusan in Sorsogon (also active), and Mt. Asog (also active) and Mt. Isarog (potentially active) in Camarines Sur.

What is happening?
Alert Level 4 has been raised over the volcano by the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs). The highest alert level is 5. Alert Level 4 means there’s an imminent big eruption and minor eruptions may occur from time to time. That’s why we see a lot of ash columns emitted from the crater.




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