Mayon Watch: Lahar (Part 3 of a series)

It only takes 40 millimeters of sustained, heavy rain for an hour and a half for lahar to occur and if Albay experiences scattered rainshowers due to the tail-end of a cold front just like last weekend, there is a high possibility of lahar.

Renato Solidum, Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) director, said that even if a river channel has old volcanic deposits, rainwater may still plow those deposits, causing lahar.




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Mayon Watch: Ed Laguerta (Part 2 of a series)

When college sophomore Eduardo Pantua Laguerta quit his education in 1978, he did not expect to be employed by the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, then Commission on Volcanology (Comvol). He believes it was destiny that brought him to Phivolcs where he is now the senior science research specialist and resident volcanologist at the Mayon Volcano Observatory.

Laguerta is the oldest of five siblings. His parents, both of whom grew up in their relatives’ houses when they were orphaned, wanted them to finish their studies.




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